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Readers: Bridge toll needs to go

for Brooklyn Paper
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Legislation introduced by State Sen. Andrew Gounardes (D–Bay Ridge) and Assemblywoman Mathylde Frontus (D–Coney Island) would provide Brooklyn residents using the city’s E-ZPass system who drive across the bridge at least 10 times each month, the same reduced toll price as Staten Island residents (“Fair tolls: Local pols aim to reduce Verrazzano toll for Brooklynites” by Aidan Graham, online April 18).

Brooklynites using E-ZPass system currently fork over $12.24 on each trip to the island borough, whereas Staten Island residents are charged a discounted rate of $5.50.

Readers weighed in online:

Put a train line on it for crap sake.

Jim from Cobble

A more feasible option is to extend NYC Ferry between Bay Ridge and St. George Staten Island

MJ from Bay Ridge

How about we just get rid of the tolls especially since the bonds that it was paying for have been long paid off?

Tal Barzilai

from Pleasantville, NY

Whatever it takes to keep Michael Grimm and his supporters on the other side.

Timmy from Sunset Park

Local recently elected Democrats introducing legislation that Republicans like Golden, Maliotokis, Grimm, Donovan all introduced and or supported in the past that previously and will go nowhere. If they really want to get the job done, why dont they appeal to their King Cuomo ( the second) who controls the MTA and could lower the toll for Brooklynites on a whim if he really wanted too since he controls the MTA.

T from Bath Beach

The majority of people living in Staten Island migrated from Brooklyn neighborhoods. My own daughter married and moved there 33 years ago and I’ve been paying full price to visit her and the grandkids all these years. It was particularly costly when the children were younger and we would pick them up Friday night and bring them back Sunday night.This costly toll felt like extortion - you have to pay to see them! Just like the SI residents get a discount, so should Brooklyn residents with immediate family on the SI side. This idea is long overdue.

Grace from Sheepshead Bay

Take a visit

To the Editor,

I wish that voicer Elaine Kirsch and others would visit the area in question near the Botanic Gardens, where it is proposed to erect apartment buildings (Sound off to the Editor, “High-rises and traffic the new norm in Brooklyn,” April 12 issue). Perhaps, they shouldn’t build very high buildings, but nonetheless, something should be built there. The area in question is right across the street from the former IS 320, where I taught for 19 years. I also lived two blocks from there on Lefferts Avenue until the mid 1970s.

There was a spice factory occupying the premises until the mid 1950s. It then closed, and for years on end the lot has been vacant. If Bette Davis were to see it, she would exclaim, “it’s a dump,” because that is what exactly it has become. Only the Lord knows the toxic waste that has been building up there. You cannot imagine the eye-sore that this has made the neighborhood going along
Franklin Avenue look like.

All these so-called environmentalists worry about is that their precious flowers shall not receive adequate sunlight.How about the people who live in the area and are subject to its dreadful appearance? How about voicing concerns regarding the health issues that have arisen due to what is on the ground there?

Ed Greenspan

Sheepshead Bay

At cost of homes?

To the Editor,

I am reading the Bay News — how it got to Marine Park I’ll never know — and was enthralled by the story of BQE restoration efforts (“A BQ-Plan: Renowned architecture firm reveals park proposal” by Kevin Duggan, April 12 issue). We have been hearing the doomsday proposals from many sides even up to, and including, the elimination of this much-needed transportation roadway. Now a new tri-level proposal has hit the streets with all sorts of new parks and walkways over and through this area of the Brooklyn waterfront.

This area was, quite frankly, a dump, until a little more than a dozen years ago, when planners decided to clear the blight and install new waterfront parks and bikeways. Buildings on the waterfront got a new lease on life and most were restored with new business moving in.

Looking at the bright and cheery artist rendering from architects of the Bjarke Ingels group brings a few questions. Yes, in this plan there is a newly restored Brooklyn Heights Promenade, including a triple-decker roadway hidden underneath away from upper-crust Millennials’ eyes, and beautiful parks with wonderful high-rise apartments and businesses line the Promenade.

But… where then, is the entire historic Brooklyn Heights neighborhood? Is this the future of the Heights, with all historic brownstone buildings razed for a faceless series of impersonal apartments? Did architects conveniently leave these restored homes out of the rebuilding equation? Will the communist infestation from City Hall ignore the input from these proud homeowners and push a plan like his down their throats?

Stay tuned, kiddies; there is more rancor and upset to come.

Robert W. Lobenstein

Sheepshead Bay

Language matters

To the Editor,

I wish more folks would become — and remain — more serious about the rhetoric being put before us via many of the GOP party representatives.

In my opinion, language matters when talking to voters who are stuck on sound bytes.

Progressive Democrats need be called as Democratic Humanists.

Same is true for the GOP fear-mongering of the word “socialist”: Democrats should correct the GOP and make it clear that it is about meeting the needs and wants of the people; aka altruism.

Instead of understanding, those who disagree with progressive Democrats’ views suggest I go move to Venezuela (see “tyranny” and “dictatorsh­ip,” not socialism) and completely ignore the “socialist” countries like Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Finland, where citizens have “stress-free” healthcare and paid maternity leave (just two examples).

Barry Brothers

Homecrest

Save the internet

To the Editor,

I am writing to you because I want to protect our open internet. Two years ago, the FCC, under Ajit Pai, repealed the Net Neutrality protections that make the internet an open and free platform to connect and exchange ideas. If we can’t restore these protections, the internet as we know it could change forever.

Earlier this month, Congress introduced the Save the Internet Act, which will restore the open internet protections that were repealed by the FCC in 2017. Despite having the support of more than 80 percent of Americans, many members of Congress are siding with Big Telecom to vote against this bill. I hope our representatives in Congress vote in favor of this bill. Otherwise, we’ll be forced to hold them accountable at the ballot box in 2020. Phillip Hope

Gowanus

Down the drain

To the Editor,

Drip, drip, drip, watch your tax dollars go down the drain. Have you also seen all the “Don’t Let Tax, Water, Or Repair Charges Come Between You and Your Property” full-page ads in many daily and weekly neighborhood newspapers? Even worse, was the 108-page supplement which appeared in the New York Daily News on April 17. It lists, line by line, the name of every New Yorker who owes real estate tax water sewer, emergency repair, or other property-related charges in “the City of New York may sell a lien on your property” advertisement. Is this the best way the NYC Departments of Finance, Environmental Protection, along with Housing Preservation and Development, can spend taxpayers dollars?

Why can’t all three agencies compare their respective lists of people who owe money with those filing city and state tax returns? Surely the technology exists to place a lien on any tax refunds? You could also extend citizens the courtesy of a telephone call, letter, or e-mail informing them of their overdue obligations.

What’s next, will the city send out Marshals going door-to-door serving subpoenas?

When will NYC Comptroller and 2021 Mayoral-wanna-be Scott Stringer audit and put an end to this waste, fraud, and abuse of taxpayers’ dollars?Larry Penner

Great Neck

...

To the Editor,

I am writing to you because I want to protect our open internet. Two years ago, the FCC, under Ajit Pai, repealed the Net Neutrality protections that make the internet an open and free platform to connect and exchange ideas. If we can’t restore these protections, the internet as we know it could change forever.

Earlier this month, Congress introduced the Save the Internet Act, which will restore the open internet protections that were repealed by the FCC in 2017. Despite having the support of more than 80 percent of Americans, many members of Congress are siding with Big Telecom to vote against this bill. I hope our representatives in Congress vote in favor of this bill. Otherwise, we’ll be forced to hold them accountable at the ballot box in 2020. Sandra Naidich

Park Slope

Electeds must act

To the Editor,

Majority Leader Hoyer’s statement that it’s not worth even pursuing an impeachment inquiry is reprehensible and a complete abdication of Congress and Democrats constitutional duty. Forget an election 18 months from now, we just had an election five months ago where tens of millions voted to hold Trump responsible. That’s the only reason Hoyer is Majority Leader now and not the powerless figure he apparently wants to go back to.

As a constituent of Senators Gillibrand and Schumer, and Rep. Velzquez, I will not vote in future elections for Democrats who dismiss their duties to the republic. Every day Trump stays in power is another day for a further catastrophe. And even if not impeached or convicted, an inquiry will yield evidence of wrongdoing that will help prevent reelection. I urge my elected officials to do their job!Ka Ming Wong

Gowanus

Posted 12:00 am, April 28, 2019
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Reasonable discourse

The Hunkster from Bed-Stuy says:
Having two way tolling on the VNB should've done this a long time ago through the act of Congress so there will be half the current tolls each way with rebates, create far less congestion during rush hours and avoid bridge shopping.
April 28, 1:57 pm
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
Increase tolls on all bridges (add tolls if they don't already have them) and we need congestion pricing. Too many self entitled motorists on the road, driving alone. Then they have the nerve to complain about traffic when they are too dumb to realize THEY ARE THE TRAFFIC. Some people are so dumb, then they vote for trump.
April 28, 7:35 pm
Bob from Gerritsen Beach says:
I completely agree with Henry Ford from Bay Ridge. They should also raise fares on buses and trains and cut back service and that'll teach these transit riders not to carry backpacks and take up more than one seat. Imagine these inconsiderate people reading newspapers and checking their phones during rush hour. I also like to see them put speed bumps on bicycle lanes to slow down these inconsiderate riders when sharing the road with pedestrians. I also would like something done about these inconsiderate pedestrians blocking the sidewalk while waiting for service at the street vendors. Did I leave anyone out?
April 28, 7:54 pm
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
Perhaps the police should make a welfare check, to make sure he hasn't soiled himself or got stuck under the couch.
April 28, 8:22 pm
Bob from Gerritsen Beach says:
To Henry Ford from Bay Ridge, At least I don't hide behind pseudonyms Young and taking over. Whats next presenting yourself as Mayor Deblasio. Get a life my friend from Bellevue. I didn't realize they allowed access to the Internet for patients.
April 28, 8:32 pm
Wannabe Mod from Brooklyn says:
99% of the problems with this comment section can be easily resolved by placing an IP block on the vision zero/young/wannabe henryford troll. It brings nothing of substance and the content is just about all the comments that end up getting deleted later. Your welcome.
April 29, 12:09 pm
Nooter from Staten Island says:
Lower the toll on “the other side” and they’re all gonna be coming over here! “Oh Zach, let’s leave Williamsburg and go to da Mall!” “Sure Kelly - it’s so cheap for us now!”. It’ll never work.
April 29, 12:55 pm
Wannabe Mod from Brooklyn says:
If I actually knew what I was talking about, you'd never hear from me. Your welcome.
April 29, 2:31 pm
New Jersey plates says:
Stop out of state cars from parking for free in NYC. Washington Heights are full of cars parked on the street with people from the burbs commuting with their cars and using our public transport system to go to work. The actual residents can't get spots. Sure it happens elsewhere too.
April 29, 3:36 pm
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
Ban personal vehicles in all boroughs.
April 29, 3:39 pm
Ban Citibike says:
Ban Citibike. The riders don't obey traffic laws often riding against traffic.
April 29, 6:12 pm
Joe from Greenpoint says:
If Henry Ford had a job you just know he would buy a car, probably an SUV.
April 30, 10:37 am
Joe from Greenpoint says:
People who live in Brooklyn are the problem. Make them pay tolls! And raise the tolls! And taxes too! Show the Aholes what's up.
April 30, 10:40 am
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
If Joe from Greenpoint had a brain, he might be able to post an interesting comment.
April 30, 11:23 am

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