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Deep thoughts wth Dean Haspiel

Brooklyn Paper
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Brooklyn Paper Radio

There aren’t any original ideas. But hasn’t that been said before?

That was the consensus on the latest edition of Brooklyn Paper Radio when beloved comic-book artist Dean Haspiel joined host Vince DiMiceli and GO Brooklyn editor Bill Roundy to talk about his latest graphic novel, his move into writing words without pictures, and why its a good idea to immerse yourself in the things you love if you want to make those things your life’s work.

“As much as you try to crack the code of doing something completely original, it’s almost impossible,” Haspiel said while discussing some of the influences for some of the characters he created in his new web comic “War Cry.” “I hate to say it, but your lunch influences you.”

Later, Haspiel pointed out that he has just converted from watching movies on DVD to BluRay, because he finally found a BluRay player that was in his price range.

“Those things are a dime a dozen now,” a shocked DiMiceli pointed out.

Haspiel also noted that he didn’t get his driver’s license until he was in his 40s, proving he is a late adopter of “new” technology.

DiMiceli, of course, started driving at midnight on Feb. 4, 1988, the moment he turned 17, had a Sony Playstation before it was on the market, and keeps all his videos in the cloud so they don’t take up space in his tiny house on Staten Island.

The guys also discussed the voices they hear in their heads when reading (and writing). For Haspiel as a youngster, that voice was Spider-Man creator Stan Lee, whose actual voice turned out to sound just like the like the one readers — every one of them — imagined while going through the latest edition.

“His voice is the voice,” Haspiel said, before answering a question DiMiceli may or may not of asked. “When I read other comics, do I project some kind of voice? That’s a good question.”

“I don’t know if I asked that question, but I’m glad I did,” DiMiceli said.

DiMiceli subsequently performed the voice he hears while editing and writing for The Brooklyn Paper while doing a live-read for show sponsor Dr. Joseph Lichter — a move that will surely make former deputy editor Ruth Brown laugh when she hears it.

All that, plus how Haspiel barters comic art for dental work, on the latest edition of BPR!

Brooklyn Paper radio is recorded and podcast live every Tuesday at 3:30 pm — for your convenience — from our studio in America’s Downtown and can be found, as always, right here on BrooklynPaper.com, on iTunes, and of course, on Stitcher.

“Harakiri Kane (Die! Die, Again)” at the Brick [579 Metropolitan Ave. between Lorimer Street and Union Avenue in Williamsburg, (718) 907–6189, www.bricktheater.com]. Through Nov. 20 at various times. $20. Dean Haspiel’s new graphic novel “War Cry,” his sequel to “The Red Hook,” will be available online soon.

Updated 9:16 am, November 8, 2017
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Reasonable discourse

stan chaz from greenpoint says:
Everthing you do is original - to you.
For the context of your life is the ever-moving & ever-changing
stream of time and events in which you float
--and where nothing can ever be truly the same.
We die and are reborn every precious second
....to new possibilities, new hopes and new dreams.
But then again, there's Trump.
Yech!
Nov. 8, 7:21 pm

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