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Bar none: Bed-Stuy residents worry Hot Bird owner’s new joint will bring hipster hordes

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He banned kids, but he won’t nix the new kids on the block.

A bar-owner famous for banning children from one of his watering holes declined a Bedford-Stuyvesant resident’s suggestion that his new neighborhood tavern offer preferential treatment to longtime locals over hipster newcomers during a community board meeting on Monday.

“That’s kind of pushing it,” said Frank Moe, who runs the notoriously child-free Clinton Hill bar Hot Bird and plans to open another tavern at Marcus Garvey Boulevard and Hancock Street. “I feel like my place is to treat everybody the same.”

A majority of Community Board 3 members approved Moe’s new drinking establishment, voting 16–11 in favor with one abstention and one recusal, despite the local’s concerns that it will be one of a new breed of bars that he said are more welcoming to interlopers than existing residents.

“I go to a lot of these establishments and I know it’s all the new people, the hipsters that just moved in,” said Ryan Joseph. “They get a little better treatment and I don’t want that to happen.”

Joseph isn’t the only resident worried the new bar won’t fit into its surroundings — others are troubled by the thought of a business dedicated solely to boozing setting up shop on a residential block. Moe said there won’t be any disc jockeys or live music, but the bar will stay open until 2 am, and the late-night merriment may keep neighbors awake, said one member.

“This is a drinking establishment in a residential community where people have their homes,” said board member Christopher James, who voted against the liquor license.

The new bar is also a block away from both the Glorious Church of God and a historic armory operating as a homeless shelter — placing the project in the midst of religious services and the comings and goings of the transient population. Community members questioned the wisdom of placing a bar so close to the refuge, and argued shelter dwellers might clash with the clientele.

But Moe pledged an all-inclusive, low-key atmosphere where neighbors will be welcome to mingle over a drink, and assured the panel that anyone — homeless, hipster, or otherwise — who causes trouble with other customers will get the boot.

“If people are well-behaved and want to come in and have a drink and hang out, I have no problem with anybody,” he said. “If you behave in a manor that is disruptive to other patrons, in that situation we call the police — but it is rare that happens.”

The community board’s vote is only advisory — the State Liquor Authority will ultimately decide whether the bar gets its license or not.

Reach reporter Allegra Hobbs at ahobbs@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–8312.
Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

Trollerskates from Moving Target says:
This is some great outside the box thinking. This is a can't miss opportunity for the residents of the shelter to make some supplemental income, at the time of their choosing, without having to travel far from home. Those with more motivation can make life changing money.
Jan. 7, 2016, 1:19 am
bkmanhatman from nubrucklyn says:
Did not know hassids came out to drink in his establishments. As far as I have seen, so called hipster joints are fairly interracial affairs.
Jan. 7, 2016, 10:42 am
John Wasserman from Prospect Heights says:
"The new bar is also a block away from both the Glorious Church of God and a historic armory operating as a homeless shelter — placing the project in the midst of religious services and the comings and goings of the transient population. Community members questioned the wisdom of placing a bar so close to the refuge, and argued shelter dwellers might clash with the clientele"

Now, if you'll pardon my saying so, it is highly unlikely that these "poors" will be entering the bar (unless, of course mouthwash is sold there ((and even then it would have to be sold at a discount rate))). Pardon the interruption.
John Wasserman
Jan. 7, 2016, 4:44 pm
samir kabir from downtown says:
What does "these poors" mean? And what does the comment about mouthwash mean?
Jan. 8, 2016, 1:33 am
Charles from Bklyn says:
What's wrong with hipster hords? Usually a good group of people.
Jan. 8, 2016, 11:35 pm
Henrietta from Brooklyn says:
Samir Kabir - you are a guest in this country, the least you could do is learn our language!
Poor means having little or no money. I'm sure you're familiar with that from your own country.
Mouthwash is a hygiene product. People in this country clean themselves occasionally, a concept you've surely never heard of - but should have!
Jan. 10, 2016, 8:59 am
laura says:
Henrietta - you are a guest and a pest of a guest at that. The question was obviously rhetorical and if you think Muslims are dirty you're insults would carry more weight if they were informed. They wash five times a day to pray. And you're a complete and total ——.
Feb. 7, 2016, 3:12 pm
benard from Bed Stuy says:
The new bar is also a block away from both the Glorious Church of God and a historic armory operating as a homeless shelter — placing the project in the midst of religious services and the comings and goings of the transient population. Community members questioned the wisdom of placing a bar so close to the refuge, and argued shelter dwellers might clash with the clientele.

Why should poor homeless people be in a bar ?
Feb. 8, 2016, 1:58 am

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