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Animal-rights group interrupts Nathan’s hot-dog-eating contest

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See it!: Vegans, contestants duke it out at Nathan’s competition

Condiment of condemnation: An animal-rights protestor pours fake blood on competitors’ hot dogs.
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It was a food fight!

Animal-rights activists doused an eater in fake blood and got in a scuffle with another during the Nathan’s hot-dog–eating contest on July 4.

Hot-dog-hating vegans from Direct Action Everywhere climbed up on stage and threw the goo on Dan “Big Cat” Katz and Crazy Legs Conti about two minutes into the annual gorge-a-thon. Katz, who ate just 12 of the meaty treats, predicted he could have exceeded champion Joey Chesnut’s record-breaking 70 had the animal liberation lobby not tossed the unconventional topping his way.

“Probably would have hit 80 Hot Dogs without that lost time,” Katz tweeted after.

Police arrested three and are charging them with criminal mischief, harassment, and inciting a riot, officials said.

One attacker decried the carnivorous carnival in a press release issued afterward.

“This grotesque event takes a day of celebration and turns it into a festival of violence and gore for animals no different than our dogs and cats,” said Rachel Zeigler, a member of the cuffed trio.

Competitive eater Conti lashed out at two of the wieners, driving one off stage, video shows. He ate just one dog, according to official results — but Conti proved his guts ahead of the contest, downing a dozen in three minutes atop a car on the rotating Wonder Wheel on June 24.

See the attack:

Courtesy Direct Action Everywhere

Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

John Wasserman from Prospect Heights says:
“This grotesque event takes a day of celebration and turns it into a festival of violence and gore for animals no different than our dogs and cats,” said Rachel Zeigler, a member of the cuffed trio.

-Now, I don't want to start any trouble here, but the comment (located above) has got me thinking. Perhaps all of the poor stray cats should be eaten. There are so many of them around that are not living happy lives, to say the least. Of course I mean this in the least cruelty of ways: they should be eaten AFTER they are dead so they do not feel any pain or mental anguish. Pardon the suggestion.
John Wasserman/Cat Lover
July 5, 2016, 10:51 am
Mitchel Cohen from Bensonhurst says:
The animal rights folks made the point that we hardly ever think about where our food comes from. I had a friend who worked in the Oscar Mayer factory in Chicago, working all day with thousands of carcasses of slaughtered animals. He told me he'd never eat another hot dog, after seeing not only the results of the mass slaughter of animals but also what ends up in the franks, despite government checks and Oscar Mayer's generally cleaner reputation than other vendors.

I also question Nathans agreeing to not allow hot-dog eating champ Takeru Kobayashi to take part starting around 7 years ago unless he agreed to join Major League Eating, the syndicate representing the other competitors. What's up with that?
July 5, 2016, 11:19 am
Patrick from Madison WI says:
Vegans do not hate dead bodies, we are simply repulsed by the violence which caused their death, and by the practice of putting them in one's mouth and eating them.
This repulsion, of course, is caused by respect for someone else's life, which is the opposite of hate.
Attempts to associate the promotion of nonviolence with hate make one look foolish, desperate and sociopathic.
July 5, 2016, 4:16 pm
Matt from Greenpoint says:
Why would anyone try to push their views on someone else?
July 6, 2016, 12:33 am

Comments closed.

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