Sections

Panda-monium! Prospect Park Zoo debuts a pair of cuddly red cubs

Oh, babies!: Newborn red panda cubs, left, Bo and sis Mei Mei are celebrities rising to new heights at the Prospect Park Zoo, while a grounding parent makes sure they don’t get above themselves.
for The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Aww-some!

Two adorable red panda cubs born at the Prospect Park Zoo this summer were introduced to smitten fans over the weekend, and they lapped up the attention like the stars they were born to be, according to a zoo big wig.

“They made their public debut!” said the animal park’s director Denise McClean, adding all eyes were focused on cuddly Bo and snuggly sis’ Mei Mei as they chilled in front of cooing crowds captivated by the magnificent mammals, whose ancestors hail from the Himalayas.

The Wildlife Conservation Society, which operates the Prospect Park Zoo as well animal sanctuaries in Manhattan and the Bronx, saves red pandas in China and Myanmar as part of its species survival program. It then breeds them to boost the species’ declining numbers due to deforestation hacking away at their natural habitats.

The results are a win-win, claimed a spokesman.

“As ambassadors for their cousins in the wild, the zoo’s red pandas help us tell an important conservation story,” said Max Pulsinelli. “They are adorable animals, and the new cubs are delighting visitors each day.”

Bo and Mei Mei, whose fluffy coats will coarsen in about 18 months when they become adults, are quite the nimble newborns — they have a wrist adaptation that acts much like a thumb, enabling them to grasp food and tree branches.

Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:


Reasonable discourse

Comments closed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Keep it local!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter: