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Crooks jump man and take his credit cards

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62nd Precinct

Bensonhurst—Bath Beach

Three-way

Three goons beat and robbed a man on 20th Avenue on Oct. 20.

The victim told police he was between Benson and Bath avenues at 1:10 am when the crooks jumped him, threw him to the ground, and then went through his pockets. The scoundrels ended up ripping credit cards off the man, before fleeing into the early morning darkness, cops said.

Legal aid

Two cunning thieves ripped off a 17-year-old boy for $900 and his cellphone on 17th Avenue on Oct. 22 after approaching him in search of legal help.

The victim told police that he was between 77th and 78th streets at 2:18 pm when a woman in her 30s approached and requested help finding a lawyer. As they were talking, another man showed up and offered help, and the trio then jumped in a van, ostensibly to drive off in search of a legal aid, according to police.

They were over by 75th Street and 18th Avenue when the crooks turned on the poor kid, and took his cash and phone, cops said.

Pump and punch

A crook beat and robbed a 66-year-old man at an 86th Street gas station on Oct. 24.

The victim told police that he was pumping gas between 16th and 17th avenues at 7 am when some goon sucker-punched him from behind and took $200 out of his pockets.

Bottle opener

Cops busted a man who they say assaulted another gentleman on 72nd Street on Oct. 24, cracking a glass bottle off the side of his head.

The victim told police that he was between 20th and 21st avenues at 11:55 am when, out of nowhere, a glass bottle was hurled in his direction and broke on his head, opening up a nasty gash.

Man at work

A burglar looted a 21st Avenue construction site sometime between Oct. 24, taking tools.

The victim told police the crook stole into the work site between 86th Street and Benson Avenue at 6 pm, scuttling through a hole in the fence, and then grabbed a ladder to clamber up into an open window.

The thief made off with a water drill, laster, welder, powder activator, and screw driver, cops said.

Tool time

A thief looted a Cropsey Avenue work site sometime between Oct. 23 and Oct. 26.

The victim told police that he left the site between Bayview Place and 24th Avenue at 4 pm, and returned three days later to find a lock that secured the premises was sawed off and that his jackhammer, generator, chop saw, and battery charger were missing.

Jewel thief

A thief looted a W. Eighth Street apartment on Oct. 26, taking jewelry and a watch.

The victim told police that he left his home between Avenue P and Quentin Road at 7:15 am and returned at 9 pm to find his front door had been busted in. Inside his pad, he found a pair of diamond earrings and a watch were missing, cops said.

Phone snatcher

A thief snatched the phone out of a 36-year-old woman’s hands on Bay Parkway on Oct. 20.

The victim told police that she was near 67th Street at 9:39 pm when the crook ran up, grabbed the phone, and fled on foot.

Grand theft auto

A carjacker drove off with a man’s Ford E350 he’d parked on 84th Street on Oct. 22.

The victim told police he left his vehicle between Bay 16th Street and 18th Avenue at 10:45 pm, and returned the next day to find an empty spot where his ride had been.

— Colin Mixson

Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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