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Eternal mother’s love

Kudos to Brooklyn artist Robin Antar. The talented sculptor has followed her passion to record in stone the cultural and personal events that have impacted her greatly.

Her latest creation at Zucker Hillside Hospital is the most personal to date. Robin created “David’s Knot in Flames,” as a tribute to her late son, David Antar, who passed away in 2013 at the age of 26.

The Standing O pal commented on how hard it was to carve this as a grieving mother, but as a sculptor it was a healing endeavor. “It breaks open into a flame to show how he rose above the hardships and finally, as a soul, rose even higher — into Heaven itself,” she explained.

Robin introduced the piece that sits in the Green Space section on Sept. 30. She brought along chips from the original carving, so that employees can own a piece of the sculpture, and share her love for her son.

“I hope that space will inspire hope for patients and families and also be a place used by staff to remind them of the importance of the life-saving work they do every day,” she said.

Zucker Hillside Hospital (75-59 263rd St. in Glen Oak, New York).

Read Standing O every Thursday on BrooklynDaily.com!
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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