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Stan has some more numbers for you

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And here we go again with more of America, by the numbers.

Eighty percent of all students starting out at a community college say they intend to eventually get a four year bachelor’s degree. Only 10 percent achieve that goal. Why? Many years ago I was invited to lecture at some early morning classes at Kingsborough Community College. Instead of being in their seats at the 9 am start, half the class would wander in whenever they felt like, some with earphones on, others carrying their breakfast. They had no intentions of getting an education. They were there because a) daddy promised them a car if they go to college or, b) it was either that or get a job.

An article in the Wall Street Journal tells us the results of a new study funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Thirty percent of the world’s population, about 2.1 billion people, is obese. The United States is home for about 87 million obese people, more than any other country. We do know why, don’t we? Seven years ago there were one thousand farms in the U.S. that grew kale. That number has almost tripled. Is kale really that healthy? Do you eat it?

President Obama has spent $120,000 on a dog trainer and uses our taxpayer dollars to bankroll his whims — like flying in barbers from Chicago aboard Air Force One and flying in chefs from St. Louis for kid’s pizza night. These numbers don’t include how many of our taxpayer dollars are spent on Michelle and her oversized staff.

The new report from the Pew Research Center tells us that 40 percent of all newlyweds are at the alter for the second time. Widows and widowers who were happy the first time around generally try it again. Also, from Sociology Professor Andrew Cherlin of Johns Hopkins University, “… the share of the population that’s divorced has risen greatly,” hence more singles out there generally lead to more marriages. At this very moment you are singing the Sinatra hit to yourself: “Love Is Lovelier the Second Time Around”

In the past six years the number of babies born to teenagers was decreased by 38.4 percent. Why are less teens getting pregnant? Perhaps more young ladies are learning about various methods of birth control. We do know about the significant increase in the use of IUDs, which in 2002 was only 0.3 percent, and is now used by almost 5 percent of active young ladies. My friend over at the local pharmacy tells me that prescriptions for diaphragms are up significantly. There is also a popular television show, “16 and Pregnant” which realistically deglamorizes young motherhood. Add those to the fears of sexually transmitted diseases and let us all applaud the results.

Pew Research analyzed the exit polls of the recent elections and found that 62 percent of the Latinos voted for Democrats. That’s down from 68 percent two years ago. Thirty-six percent voted for Republicans. That’s up from 30 percent in 2012. All were asked to name the most important issue facing the nation. Forty-nine percent of the Latinos said the economy, 24 percent said healthcare and only 16 percent pointed to immigration reform. We could analyze these numbers in the light of the recent executive orders discuss this for months.

How long do you want to live? Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel wants to die at age 75 because after that those who are older are no longer productive members of society and become a burden as they gobble up collective health resources. Dr. Emanuel is one of the primary architects of Obamacare and a chief medical advisor to the Obama administration.

I am StanGershbein@Bellsouth.Net, thinking that Sarah Palin’s thoughts about death panels are right here in the current White House.

Read Stan Gershbein's column every Monday on BrooklynDaily.com.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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