Sections

Wail song: Whale found dead on Brighton Beach

Beached: A baby humpback whale was found dead on Brighton Beach near Ocean Parkway on June 8.
Brooklyn Daily
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

An adult female Minke whale was found dead on Brighton Beach near Ocean Parkway on Monday.

A strike from a ship’s propeller likely killed the animal, which had severe injuries to its head, according to biologists from the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation who performed a necropsy on the body.

In addition to the head wounds, biologists found internal bruising, propeller slices and mechanical laceration. They believe the death occurred within the last two days. The whale’s dissected carcass was transported to a Parks Department facility where it will be disposed of safely, while samples of the remains were transported to the Riverhead facility for further testing.

This isn’t the first cetacean to meet its end in Brooklyn. A 30-foot Sei whale beached itself near the Brooklyn Army Terminal in May last year, and in 2007 a 12-foot Minke whale — dubbed “Sludgie” — swam up the Gowanus Canal and died before rescuers could move it back out to sea.

Minke whales are abundant off the coast of Brooklyn, said a Riverhead representative, and ship strikes are a leading cause of death for whales in these waters.

“It is a common cause of death for whales because there are boats coming in and out,” said Rachel Bosworth. “If it’s a large vessel, they might not even be aware they hit it.”

As of now, authorities know nothing about the boat the killed the whale.

Reach reporter Allegra Hobbs at ahobbs@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–8312.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:


Reasonable discourse

Comments closed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Keep it local!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter: