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Tragic: Missing Marine Park man found dead

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The autistic man who vanished from his home in February was found dead on a Marine Park golf course on April 2, a spokeswoman for the family confirmed today.

Brian Gewirtz, who also suffered from anxiety and Type 2 diabetes, was last seen at his Marine Park home on Coleman Street near Quentin Road at 9:30 am on Feb. 17. The Gewirtz family had been searching for the 20-year-old man for weeks, organizing large-scale searches, posting flyers, and checking with hospitals and homeless shelters across the city.

But on Thursday his body was found near the waterfront in Marine Park at Flatbush Avenue near Avenue U — less than two miles from his home.

The NYPD found his body on the shore of Flatbush Avenue near Avenue U at 4:21 pm.

The tragic end to the desperate search echoes the case of Avonte Oquendo, an autistic 14-year-old from Queens whose disappearance in October 2013 sparked a citywide grassroots search effort. Oquendo’s remains were found three months after he vanished.

The Medical Examiner’s Office did not immediately return requests for comment regarding the cause of Gewirtz’s death.

Reach reporter Vanessa Ogle at vogle@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–4507. Follow her attwitter.com/oglevanessa.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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