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Brooklynites weigh in on test-tube beef

We ask: Would you eat petri meat?

for The Brooklyn Paper
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Photo gallery

1/5
This is a really cool concept. Yeah, I think I would. I don’t have any reservations and I feel a lot of people are moving towards trying new things. Arumme Agaiwal, Clinton Hill
2/5
We have enough problems with our food as it is. But if you didn’t know, it wouldn’t matter. Minerva Morales, Park Slope
3/5
No, no, no. USDA-approved only. Denzel Greene, East Flatbush
4/5
I’d give it a try. You don’t have any on you, do you? Forrest Myers, Williamsburg
5/5
No. There are so many layers to how nature creates something. We can’t just skim the surface and say ‘That’s what makes meat.’” Lesley Kernochan, Ditmas Park

The idea of test tube meat is as intriguing as it is revolting, so we figured we should put the big-money question that could make or break the bio-tech industry to everyday Brooklynites: “Would you eat a hamburger grown in a test tube?”

Un-surprisingly, their responses were as mixed as a vat of ground beef.

— Max Jaeger

Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

Rufus Leaking from BH says:
Why would you have to?

Cows are not extinct.
Jan. 31, 2014, 10:24 am
resident from Brooklyn says:
No
Jan. 31, 2014, 10:25 am
resident from Brooklyn says:
No, no, and no.
Jan. 31, 2014, 10:26 am
John Wasserman from Prospect Heights says:
What we've got here is a very confused John Wasserman. Wouldn't a hamburger from a test tube be more like a hot dog? I'm going to have to demand that you shall pardon my curiosity here, because this does not make a whole lot of sense.
John Wasserman/Partiot/Parent
Feb. 3, 2014, 4:23 pm

Comments closed.

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