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Scoundrel swipes $6,000, passport from car

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78th Precinct

Park Slope

Car cash

A thief stole thousands in cash and a passport from a man’s parked car on Fifth Avenue on Nov. 1, police said.

The victim left his vehicle between First and Second streets at about 5 pm and went to dinner, leaving a briefcase containing $6,000 and a United States passport inside, according to a report.

When he returned a short while later, the luggage was gone along with the loot inside, although the car showed no signs of forced entry, officers stated.

Stole foods

A bandit swiped a shopper’s wallet from her bag as she shopped at the Whole Foods Market at Third Street and Third Avenue on Nov. 9, law enforcement officials said.

The woman was strolling the aisles around 1:50 pm when the stealthy pickpocket extracted her wallet, which contained a debit card and $160 in cash, according to a report.

Air-bags to riches

A daring crook took the air-bags from a parked car on Sixth Street on Nov. 9, without activating the protective pillows, according to a report.

The victim parked the 2001 Bavarian Motor Works buggy near Prospect Park West and returned to find the driver’s-side window smashed and the equipment taken, cops said.

Security flaw

A bandit boosted a custom bicycle from an apartment building on Fourth Avenue on Nov. 6, according to the authorities.

The victim locked his Surly Long Haul Trucker to a pole inside the lobby of the building between Garfield Place and Carroll Street, but he said the front door to the lobby does not close all the way.

— Noah Hurowitz

Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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