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Nydia Velazquez outlines goals after easy 2014 election win

Congresswoman’s pledges as she enters 12th term

The Brooklyn Paper
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Keep Brooklyn working-class, immigrant friendly, and affordable to live in.

Those are the stated goals of Nydia Velazquez, the 11-term incumbent Democratic congresswoman serving neighborhoods from Bushwick to Dumbo to Sunset Park, who sailed to an easy victory in Tuesday’s election against unknown Republican and Conservative party challengers.

“My overarching priority is always making our communities more livable for New York’s working families,” said Velazquez. “Creating job growth and economic opportunity is critical.”

In her next term, Velazquez said she wanted to focus on helping women and racial minorities start small businesses.

“This sector remains a cornerstone of our local economy,” she said.

Velazquez also wants to continue pushing for immigration reform. She is a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus’s Immigration Task Force, which wants to speed up family visa petitions and develop a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, among other goals. A bipartisan immigration reform package passed the Senate in 2013, but has been blocked by Republicans in Congress.

“In many ways, this is the civil rights issue of our time,” said Velazquez. “As we continue working to end policies that tear apart families, it is incumbent on all of us to create a sensible, sane, workable immigration system that honors our nation’s and our city’s immigrant heritage.”

Velazquez is also big on affordable housing, and touted her record supporting fights for greater rent regulation and tougher penalties for harassing landlords.

Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at dfurfaro@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2511. Follow her at twitter.com/DanielleFurfaro.
Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

John from Bushwick says:
Why only help white hispanic working class but not white italian or irish working class? Why not help all young people start businesses if they have the drive and ideas?
Nov. 5, 2014, 10:32 am
Dafuq from Brooklyn says:
What's funny? She's been in office for over 20 years and most of Bklyn has Dem leaders, but black & brown young males are at near 40% unemployment across any of our lifetimes -- and They keep saying the same things, getting re-elected then doing nothing but saying the same things.
Nov. 5, 2014, 11:07 am
Mike from Williamsburg says:
Gloria, Puerto Ricans don't need visas. They are American citizens.

But I don't think Velazquez's quote supports the claim that she wants to keep Brooklyn working class. She wants to keep Brooklyn hospitable to the working class, which is different. She's not out there telling kids to skip college because they should be working class.
Nov. 5, 2014, 12:09 pm
bkmanhatman from nubrucklyn says:
@John from Bushwick
Because all the white working class italians & irish moved out to be replaced by trustafarian supported Hipster Italians & Irish from suburban NY, NJ, & Long Island.
Nov. 5, 2014, 12:44 pm
Epiphany from Ex-Brooklyn says:
“My overarching priority is always making our communities more livable for New York’s working families,” said Velazquez.

If that has been her priority, she's a TOTAL failure, and this lady must have been asleep at her job for the past 20 years. Has she visited Brooklyn lately and gotten out of her chauffeured car to look around?
Nov. 5, 2014, 1:30 pm
"Interloper" from Kent Ave says:
Translation: "I hate white people too, vote for me."
Nov. 5, 2014, 3:23 pm
Peter Engel from Downtown Brooklyn says:
Total meaningless blather
Nov. 6, 2014, 11:42 am
Jim from Cobble Hill says:
"12 terms" is a very disturbing thing.
Nov. 7, 2014, 12:05 pm

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