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Cheers to borough daughters on congressional recogntion

Brooklyn Daily
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Greenpoint

This one is for local history books! Rep. Carolyn Maloney and Assemblyman Joe Lentol honored Tish Cianciotta and Dana Rachlin with congressional certificates of recognition for their work to make Brooklyn a better place for everyone.

Standing O learned that Tish advocates for her neighbors through Concerned Citizens of Withers Street, and fights to improve our quality of life as a member of Community Board 1. She is also active in the People’s Firehouse and the Greenpoint Renaissance Enterprise Corporation.

Fellow honoree Dana is equally dedicated, helping at-risk youth as a program coordinator for Greenpoint Youth Court, which hears cases involving teens who have committed low-level offenses. She is also active in three police precinct community councils and various anti-violence organizations on Staten Island.

Maloney (N.Y.–12) said the pair’s work was humbling.

“I am truly honored to recognize Tish and Dana for their extraordinary contributions and service to the Brooklyn community,” she said.

Standing O pal Lentol (D–Greenpoint) said their efforts set a fine standard for the next generation.

“Both of these women serve as great models for future activists and community organizers,” he said. “I am glad that I have had the opportunity to work with both of them so closely.”

Standing O is happy too! Now Tish and Dana can add a “Standing O” to their accolades on the mantle.

Congressional Office [619 Lorimer St. at Skillman Street in Greenpoint; (718) 383–7474].

Read Standing O every Thursday on BrooklynDaily.com!
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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