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Thief takes $30,000 from apartment

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90th Precinct

Southside–Bushwick

A big heist

A burglar broke into a house on S. Fourth Street on July 14 and got away with $30,000 in cash.

The victim told police that he left his apartment between Bedford and Driggs avenues locked and secured at 4 pm. When he returned just after midnight on July 15, he found the door wide open.

He went into the house to investigate and found the living room window wide open and the screen removed, and a box that he had filled with $30,000 in cash missing.

A little extra precaution

Someone stole a man’s iPad 2 from his unlocked Buswick Avenue apartment sometime between July 8 and 11.

The victim told police that he left his pad between Ainslie and Powers streets on July 8 at 5 pm, and when he returned at 2 pm on July 11, the iPad was missing. There were no signs of forced entry, which makes sense since the door was unlocked anyway.

Neighbors said they saw a strange man turning doorknobs in the building.

Oversharing sister

Police are looking for a woman who they say busted into her brother’s Meserole Street apartment and swiped his medication and video camera on July 13.

The victim said he came home to his abode between Union Avenue and Lorimer Street at 8 am on July 13 to find his 90 oxycodone pills, 30 Xanax pills, and one digital video camera missing.

The 32-year-old man told police he got an e-mail from his 25-year-old sister telling him that she had broken down his front door.

Slow train coming

A quick crook swiped a man’s cellphone while he was sitting on a Manhattan-bound M train at the Lorimer Street stop on July 15.

The victim told police that he boarded the train at Flushing Avenue at 1 am on July 15. He sat down in the first car near the exit door and started playing a game on his phone. When the train pulled up to the Lorimer Street stop, a weasel snatched the cellphone out of his hands and ran out of the car. The 34-year-old victim then got off the train at Hewes Street and called police.

Ride to mayhem

A cold-hearted brute stabbed a man in the chest and back several times on the B62 bus while it rode through Williamsburg on July 16.

The victim refused to tell police much of anything about what happened to him.

“I didn’t see anything. I had my eyes closed,” the victim told police.

But two witnesses, including the bus driver, told cops that the victim was in the back of the bus when a man and woman got on at 8:50 am and immediately started arguing with the victim. The three started fighting, rolling around on the floor of the bus, and when it stopped at Keap Street and Wythe Avenue, the man and woman got off, and the man threw a gray metal knife under a parked car, police reported.

The woman ran away on foot towards the housing development on Wythe Avenue. The 26-year-old victim was taken to Kings County Hospital and is not likely to die.

Repeat offenders

A 19-year-old man and a 20-year-old man were arrested for trying to strongarm phones out of victims’ hands on Olive Street and Bushwick Avenue on July 17.

The 23-year-old victim told police he was near DeVeau Street at 12:05 am when the two toughs approached him and punched him several times in the face and tried to grab his phone out of his hand. The victim’s glasses flew, but were recovered and returned him. The duo did not get the phone.

The two were also charged with an assault and robbery for stealing a cellphone from a guy waiting for a bus at the southeast corner of Bushwick Avenue and Grand Avenue. That victim was also beaten and suffered swelling to the face and head, cops said.

— Danielle Furfaro

Updated 10:13 pm, July 9, 2018
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