Sections

East Coast Professional Wrestling comes to Our Lady of Guadalupe School in Bensonhurst

Fans fawn over Tony “Brooklyn Bulldog” Biella

Brooklyn Daily
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Are you ready to rrrrruuumble?

The crowd at Our Lady of Guadalupe sure was on April 20, when the crew from East Coast Professional Wrestling roared into town for a sweaty, testosterone-soaked, no-holds barred smackdown at the 72nd Street school.

Kids and their parents screamed extra loudly for Tony “Brooklyn Bulldog” Biella, a Bensonhurst boy turned ring pro, who shook hands with kids and let them hold his Five Boros championship belt.

“It’s great, he’s a neighborhood guy, and he’s a local champion, and people love” said event organizer Gary Cassiliano, president of the school’s youth program.

Kids also got to to go into the ring to meet the other wrestlers and pull tickets from the night’s 50/50 raffle — the best thing about the event, according to Cassiliano.

“The kids really get to be part of the show. That’s why we have it. It’s not something that’s behind barricades. It’s completely interactive,” the parent and parish member said.

Proceeds from the 400 ticket sales went to a great cause — repairing and maintaining the 105-year-old church, an architectural marvel.

Cassiliano said he cannot wait for the next wrestling event in October, when Biella will take on his mentor and trainer — and fellow Bensonhurst native — Gino Caruso.

“It’s going to be really exciting, two neighborhood guys going at it,” said Cassiliano.

Reach reporter Will Bredderman at wbredderman@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4507. Follow him at twitter.com/WillBredderman.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:


Reasonable discourse

Comments closed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Keep it local!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter: