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Borough President Markowitz welcomes Nets back court to Brooklyn

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Brooklyn’s new all-stars are finally here!

Joe Johnson and Deron Williams — both multiple NBA all-stars — were given a borough-wide welcome on Friday, amid roaring cheers from Brooklynites, the Brooklynettes carrying a giant Junior’s cheesecake.

The Nets acquired Joe Johnson from the Atlanta Hawks after a five-player trade, giving up their first-round draft pick for 2013. During the 2011 to 2012 season, Johnson scored an average 18.8-points a game, and competed for the United States international team in 2006.

Deron Williams, long-time Nets player, and first-time Brooklyn athlete, committed to the team for another five years. Williams has scored the most points in Nets franchise history in a 57-point demolition against the Charlotte Bobcats in March earlier this year, the most points during the season. He is currently a guard in this summer’s Olympic games.

The dynamic duo has been dubbed “Brooklyn’s backcourt.”

“They can defend anybody in the league, they can score on anybody in the league, and they can lead us,” says Billy King, the Nets’ general manager, who proudly boasts that the team has the best backcourt in the NBA.

Borough President Markowitz welcomed the all-stars to the borough, right before offering them a huge slice of Junior’s cheesecake.

“Deron, even though you’re a three-time all-star and an Olympic gold medalist; and Joe, even though you’re a six-time NBA all-star, now that you’ve made it to Brooklyn’s big stage,” Markowitz said.

“Your best days are ahead of you.”

Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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