Sections

A ‘fine’ mess

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Michael Tropp and Arlene Tropp, at 165-167 Norfolk St. in Manhattan Beach have 15 unpaid Department of Buildings fines, according to city records. Here they are:

• Dec. 11, 2002: $2,500 for connecting his two houses without a permit.

• Dec. 11, 2002: $2,500 for building a curb cut and a light pole without a permit.

• Feb. 6, 2003: $2,500 for not complying with the first violation for connecting the two houses.

• Feb. 6, 2003: $10,000 for not complying with orders to get a permit for a curb cut and a light pole.

• June 30, 2009: $500 for a second unpermitted curb cut

• June 30, 2009: $4,000 for failing to comply with various previous violations.

• June 30, 2009: $4,000 for getting rid of the mandated side yard between his two properties.

• June 30, 2009: $4,000 for a rear yard that doesn’t comply with zoning.

• June 30, 2009: $8,000 for building a two-story structure and chimney that links two houses without a permit.

• June 30, 2009: $4,000 for building a chimney that’s too short, in accordance with building code.

•Nov. 10, 2009: $12,000 for still not getting a permit for the two-story structure and chimney that links the two houses

• Jan. 6, 2010: $4,000 for constructing without a permit a wooden deck with an above-ground pool in the backyard.

• May 6, 2010: $12,000 for still not getting a permit for the two-story structure and chimney.

• Sept. 2, 2010: $25,000 for building a brick walkway connecting his two houses without a permit

• Nov. 10, 2010: $25,000 fine for still not getting a permit for building a brick walkway connecting his two houses.

TOTAL AS OF TODAY: $124,000.

Updated 5:22 pm, July 9, 2018
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:


Reasonable discourse

Comments closed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Keep it local!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter: