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What Paul Krugman should have done

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Really, how small-minded can Paul Krugman of the New York Times be? In his column published on 9-11, the Noble Prize pundit wrote a 181 word condemnation stating “The memory of 9-11 has been irrevocably poisoned; it has become an occasion for shame. And in its heart, the nation knows it.”

Krugman posed the question, “How Many of our professional pundits — people who should have understood very well what was happening — took the easy way out, turning a blind eye to the corruption and lending their support to the highjacking of the atrocity?”

But isn’t he himself taking the easy way out by taking cheap potshots while he sits in his “Monday Morning Quarterback” chair telling us what we already know? In his 181-word diatribe he rails against those “fake heroes” who “turned a blind eye.” When in fact there were many, many others that had no other agenda but to do their job on that tragic day and on the many days that followed. What was and is important on this 10th anniversary, and all future ones, is that we commemorate, memorialize and remember those very ordinary people that performed with very extraordinary courage in an extraordinarily terrible and terrifying moment in our history, and not an “occasion for shame.”

Instead of honoring those lost and offering a comforting word to those left behind, Mr. Krugman took the opportunity to tell a fat person that he was fat. Thanks for the obvious Mr. Krugman, we all appreciate your candor.

Yes, there have been many politicians as well as private individuals that have taken and will take advantage of the situation by jumping aboard the 9-11 gravy train for their own greedy self-serving needs, its the nature of the beast, and we are all very aware of who they are. But they do not define us as a nation. No, Mr. Krugman, there are the other 311-million Americans out there that are not fake heroes, that live their lives in dignity, honor and grace under fire that do. They are the service men and women that put on their helmets, clean their guns and defend our rights every single day, including your rights Mr. Krugman, that are not in it for the political gain and get very little in return.

The purpose of commemorating this date, this 10th anniversary, like all those that have passed and all those yet to come, is solely and wholly to honor those individuals that lived in dignity and honor and performed their job with courage and grace. Never forget and never forgotten.

Unlike Mr. Krugman in his final paragraph, “I’m not going to allow comments on this post for obvious reasons.” You can feel free to post any comments you wish for obvious reasons. This is America, the land were free speech is right up there in our Constitution, the same Constitution that allows members of the Fourth Estate, like Mr. Krugman, to spew whatever comments he chooses, no matter how small and inappropriate they may be.

Not for Nuthin, But Mr. Krugman should have heeded the old adage — if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.

Jdelbuono@cnglocal.com.

Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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