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Moving day headache on Third Avenue

The Brooklyn Paper
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Box basher

A brazen jerk swiped some fancy jewelry and thousands of bucks from a man on Third Avenue on May 3.

The 30-year-old victim told cops he was packing boxes to move out of his apartment near Carroll Street at 10 am, when he left his door unlocked. He came back an hour later and discovered a locked black box — full of expensive goodies — had been smashed with a baseball bat.

A pink Jacob & Co. watch, $3,500 and a diamond necklace worth $4,900 were gone.

Cash snatchers

Two teenage thugs stole some cash from a man on Fifth Avenue on May 8.

The 23-year-old victim told cops he was near Fourth Street just after 8 pm when two bullies — one in a red shirt, the other in a yellow one — began to manhandle him.

“I heard you have money,” one said, before digging into the poor guy’s pocket. They then swiped $150 and ran away.

Cops arrested the 18-year-old and 19-year-old troublemakers the same day.

Lowe’s down

A quick-moving thief snatched tech gadgets from the Lowe’s Hardware store on Second Avenue on May 4.

The 41-year-old worker told cops that he parked a gray Ford van belonging to the hardware giant near 10th Street at around 11:30 am, then came back half an hour later to discover a broken window and the absence of a $200 global positioning device.

Explorer gone

A crafty thief stole a Ford Explore on Fifth Street overnight on May 6.

The 30-year-old driver told cops that he parked the black SUV near Fifth Avenue at around 9 pm, then returned the next morning at 9 am. That’s when he discovered his ride was missing — with no sign of broken glass.

Bicycle bandit

A quick-moving scoundrel swiped rental bikes from a woman on Fifth Avenue on May 5.

The 32-year-old cyclist told cops she locked Biria, Sirrus and Giant bicycles — worth $1,500 in total — near Berkeley Place at 7:15 pm, then strolled into a shop. She came back 20 minutes later, then discovered the two-wheelers had been snatched along with her lock.

Parkside smash

A thug snatched credit cards from a car parked on Flatbush Avenue on May 7.

The 48-year-old victim told cops that she parked her white 2010 Nissan Sentra near Grand Army Plaza before heading into Prospect Park at 1 pm. She returned an hour and a half later and discovered that her front window had been smashed and her cards and digital mapping device were missing.

Unsweet relief

A jerk swiped a laptop and some expensive goodies from a knife shop owner on Third Avenue on May 1.

The 36-year-old victim told cops he was cleaning out the front of Cut Brooklyn near Ninth Street at 4:15 pm when he set his bag down and went to the bathroom for 15 minutes.

That was enough time for the thug to snatch it — and the MacBook Pro, SureFire flashlight and checkbook inside.

Bad dinner

A sneaky jerk snatched a pocketbook at a restaurant on Fifth Avenue on May 1.

The 28-year-old victim told cops that she hanged her pocket book on the back of her chair, then ordered some grub at Bogota Latin Bistro near St. Johns Place at 7:30 pm. While she was munching, someone snatched her purse — and the passport, $23 and credit cards inside.

Bookish bandit

A pickpocket swiped a credit card from a woman in the Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Branch in Grand Army Plaza on May 7.

The 54-year-old victim told cops she was at library near Flatbush Avenue at around 9:30 pm when she noticed that her Citibank credit card and driver’s license had been snatched from her purse.

— Natalie O’Neill

Updated 5:24 pm, July 9, 2018
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