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Cop pleads guilty to being part of robbery crew

The Brooklyn Paper
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A dishonored NYPD cop is facing 30 years behind bars after admitting to helping a robbery crew commit more than 100 heists.

Emmanuel Tavarez, an eight-year veteran of the NYPD, told Brooklyn Federal Court Judge Sandra Townes on April 25 that he was part of a crooked team that raided known drug dens throughout the city and Philadelphia.

The thieves would suit up in their NYPD regalia, force their way inside and “arrest” drug traffickers. They would restrain their victims “with handcuffs, rope, and duct tape” and make off with cash and drugs, according to court documents.

“In addition, crew members often brandished firearms or physically assaulted their victims,” federal prosecutors claim.

The robberies began as early as 2001. The crew of 15 was ultimately brought to justice in March, 2009, but not before netting more than 250 kilograms of cocaine and $1 million in drug proceeds, prosecutors charge.

Tavarez, a Queens housing cop, was the only member of the violent robbery crew with any affiliation to the NYPD.

But Tavarez’s badge gave the crew an amazing amount of legitimacy — especially when he flashed it around moments before handcuffing his victims.

Tavarez was also responsible for supplying his teammates with NYPD jackets, equipment and doctored search warrants to make the robberies, at least at the outset, appear to be part of an official investigation, prosecutors said.

At court, Tavarez copped to his crimes as his wife wept openly in the gallery.

“I participated in the robberies of drug dealers,” Tavarez told Judge Townes. “I was a lookout.”

Tavarez decided to plead guilty after realizing the “crushing weight” of the evidence prosecutors had against him, defense attorney Raymond Colon explained. More than five members of the robbery crew had already pleaded guilty — and some were going to testify for the prosecution.

Cruel coach thrown in slammer

A Sheepshead Bay after-school soccer camp owner out on bail for molesting an 8-year-old camper was sent back to jail on April 27 — but not just for the alleged abuse.

A grand jury said there was sufficient evidence to allow the sexual abuse case against 39-year-old Stanislav Rozovsky continue, but also charged him with having 49 suspensions on his driver’s license — a mountain of misdemeanors that impelled Judge Patricia DiMango to hike the soccer coach’s bail up to $75,000.

Court officials say it will be unlikely that Rozovsky, the owner of the Dynamo New York Soccer Academy, will be able to pay the increased bail — meaning he’ll remain in jail.

Rozovskywas already out on $25,000 bail for sexually abusing an 8-year-old girl who attended his soccer camp last summer.

Brooklyn DA Charles Hynes claims Rozovsky offered the girl a ride home after a soccer game, but took her to his address on Avenue Y and sexually assaulted her.

The molestation wasn’t reported until December, when the girl told a teacher at her school what happened.

Rozovsky was arrested in February, but was only charged with the sexual abuse — not the vehicular infractions. He made bail and continued to coach children while the case was sent to the grand jury.

Assistant District Attorney Jacqueline Kagan said the evidence against Rozovsky was overwhelming.

“The child has a lot of details about the defendant’s conduct,” she told Judge DiMango.

Defense attorney Alexandra Tseitlin said Rozovsky “denies all the allegations.”

Rozovsky has been racking up the suspensions for years and has been arrested a number of times for driving on a suspended license, investigators said.

DiMango said the sex abuse allegations Rozovsky’s facing were disturbing, but she was also angered by the alarming number of suspensions on his driving record.—especially since he was responsible for driving young soccer players home after practices.

Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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