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Marty loves Dennis — a tale of two press releases

The Brooklyn Paper
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We just got Borough President Markowitz’s statement on new Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott — and it’s a rave! How do we know? We’re reading the tea leaves, that’s how.

Indeed, compare Markowitz’s new statement about Walcott issued today with the one he issued on Nov. 15, 2010 about failed Chancellor Cathie Black.

Today

BP MARKOWITZ STATEMENT ON APPOINTMENT OF DENNIS WALCOTT AS NYC SCHOOLS CHANCELLOR

“I join all of Brooklyn and our borough’s 300,000 public school students and their families in wholeheartedly welcoming Dennis Walcott — a proud son of New York City and product of the public school system, educator and, perhaps most importantly, parent and grandparent — as New York City Schools Chancellor. Deputy Mayor Walcott has been actively involved in the city’s education community, and was instrumental in enacting many of the recent positive reforms. His expertise will help stabilize the system and move it forward. I spoke with Deputy Mayor Walcott this morning and pledged to support him in every way possible, and we are excited to work together as we help our children reach the zenith of their potential.”

Nov. 15, 2010

BP MARKOWITZ STATEMENT ON MAYOR’S NYC SCHOOLS CHANCELLOR DESIGNEE CATHIE BLACK

“I was pleased today to speak with Cathie Black, the schools chancellor designee appointed by the mayor. The State Legislature of New York has given the mayor the authority to select a schools chancellor, and he is accountable for his selection. Today, as she shared with me her eagerness and excitement about this opportunity, I was impressed with her enthusiastic willingness to take on a job that comes with lots of challenges in addition to its rewards — and I wished her well. Our kids’ future depends on her success.”

Today’s news:
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Reader Feedback

Joey from Clinton Hills says:
I thought this was going to be an article about Marty in the steamroom with Dennis Hamill.
April 7, 2011, 2:06 pm
Larry from Park Slope says:
Marty's press releases are not the story today. The resignation of Cathleen P. Black is the story--and what a story.

The Black resignation underscores the empirical fact that expertise in the private sector is not automatically transferrable to the public sector.

Further, it seems that every Joe and Jane feels they are experts in education. How foolish. It takes specialized knowledge and experience to stand up in front of a class of young people and teach effectively.

It also takes extensive specialized knowledge and experience to run a vast school system like NYC's.

Cathleen P. Black did not have the specialized knowledge and experience and no amount of Mayoral muscle could give it to her. The public saw through this unfortunate appointment.
April 7, 2011, 2:12 pm
Joey from Clinton Hills says:
well, unlike Cathy Black, I know the difference between Bayside Queens and Bay Ridge Brooklyn. Also, I didn't send my kids away to private boarding school. She was a tool and a disgrace.
April 7, 2011, 4:35 pm
Steve Nitwitt from Sheepshead Bay says:
Marty loves Norm from Atlantic Yards Report
April 7, 2011, 10:59 pm
M Markowitz from Borough Hall says:
I want penis!
April 9, 2011, 9:24 am

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