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Our windmill DIY guide

The Brooklyn Paper
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You might be tilting at windmills if you want to install a turbine on your roof — for now, they’re not permitted by the city. But advocates are hoping that a pilot project in Red Hook will speed the plough, if you will. So clip and save our handy how-to guide to getting it done, courtesy of Rob Ashmore, president of turbine-installer Aeonsolar:

Step 1: Contact wind contractors, get site assessments and several proposals. Be skeptical of contractors who promise wildly optimistic energy production. Cost: $300-$1,000

Step 2: Have your contractor apply for incentives and tax credits through the state Energy Research and Development Authority.

Step 3: Apply for all the required building and electrical permits.

Step 4: Get approval from the energy giant in your area, in this case, Con Ed, to connect your system to its grid.

Step 5: Install the turbine! Cost: $2,500-$25,000, depending on the model and size.

Step 6: Using the money you save on your electric bill, buy that new Chevy Volt you’ve been eying.

— Gary Buiso

Updated 5:20 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

Monika from South slope says:
There was another wind turbine pilot project going on summer 2010.

5 kids - 12 Volts: http://open-source-gallery.org/2010/03/one-big-windmill/
Oct. 8, 2010, 8:46 am

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