Sections

August 24, 2010 / Sports / Brooklyn Cyclones / Chasing Maloof

Slump ends Ceciliani’s run at history

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

The dream of a .400 season is dead for slumping slugger Darrell Ceciliani.

In his last 10 games, through Monday night’s action, when he had the night off, the slugger who once seemed poised to follow in the footsteps of New York–Penn League legend Jack Maloof, has not only been human, but decidedly sub-human, as he’s hit .244 in 45 at-bats.

The fortnight of failure has left Ceciliani batting just .351 — still good enough for the best in the league, but not good enough to get him into the history books.

By our calculations, Ceciliani would have to go 35 for 56 — or an astounding .625 — in the Cyclones’ last 14 games in order to hit .400.

It’s sad. Earlier in Ceciliani’s quest for greatness, he even attracted the attention of former mayor Rudy Giuliani, who praised the then-.369 hitter in an interview with our Cyclones columnist Stephen Brown.

Still, teammates aren’t worried that the late-season slump will ruin the Oregon native’s chance to catch the eye of big-league scouts.

“He’ll be all right,” said Cory Vaughn, the team’s slugging right fielder. “You’re focused on .400, but he’s going to end the season batting .350 or .360, so I’m not worried about Darrell. Man, I would love to hit .350!”

Updated 5:20 pm, July 9, 2018
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:


Reasonable discourse

Comments closed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Keep it local!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter: