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Fidler tix troubles

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Fidler tix troubles

All the dramatic rhetoric generated by members of the City Council about out-of-control ticketing by city agencies isn’t just an abstraction any more for City Councilmember Lewis Fidler, who himself got hit by a ticket issued by an overzealous public servant.

Fidler got a $130 summons after he left his car double-parked on Flatlands Avenue a couple of Sundays ago, when he attended the annual holiday lighting extravaganza at former Assemblymember Frank Seddio’s house.

Not only that, he told members of the United Canarsie South Civic Association during their December meeting, but so did the drivers of all the other cars double-parked near an auxiliary police vehicle in a lane that had been closed off because of the event.

“It’s not necessary that, every time you breathe, you are ticketed,” remarked Fidler. “They probably fined people $2,500 in total for the privilege of coming and participating in this when they had the lane of traffic blocked off anyway,” Fidler opined, noting that ticketing of cars of people at the event had never occurred before.

“Merry Christmas,” he concluded.

While it was unclear why cars parked in a blocked off lane were ticketed, police sources said that Fidler’s car was a half a block away from Seddio’s house. His car was also reportedly blocking in a woman trying to leave, sources said.

Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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