Sections

Gentile Has Easy Win in Council Race

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

While southwestern Brooklyn is often a political minefield, the expected battle for the City Council seat in the 43rd district never reached that level, with the Democratic incumbent, Vincent Gentile, scoring an easy victory over his Republican opponent, Bob Capano.

On Election Night, November 3rd, unofficial tallies put Gentile -- who also was running on the Working Families line -- with 59.73 percent of the vote, and Capano -- who also had the Conservative and Independence Party lines -- with 40.27 percent.

In total, Gentile, who is popular across the district, amassed 13,217 votes, and Capano collected 8,911 votes, according to the unofficial numbers.

It was an early evening for the victor and his supporters. By 10 p.m., champagne corks were popped at Gentile’s headquarters, the Stars & Stripes Democratic Club, 7321 15th Avenue, as a cheering crowd greeted the ebullient Gentile.

“Oh, my God,” he pronounced. “Oh, my God. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

“There are two words that defined this campaign from the beginning,” Gentile went on. “Those two words were proven leadership. Now, tonight, with this big win, we can add two more words that define this campaign: We won.”

And, he added, “Unlike my opponent’s campaign, we got it done without one negative word.”

It hasn’t always been this easy for Gentile. A former state senator, who lost his seat to then-City Councilmember Marty Golden in 2002, Gentile has beaten back fierce challenges over the years from a variety of opponents, including such heavy-hitters as former Republican State Senators Chris Mega and Bob DiCarlo.

This year, however, the joy of victory was bittersweet in one regard, as Gentile made clear when he spoke of those who had died over the course of the year.

“I dedicate this campaign to my mom,” he noted, mentioning also such local activists as Bob Buonvino and Helen Sokoloski, both of whom died earlier this year.

Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:


Reasonable discourse

Comments closed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Keep it local!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter: