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“It’s pretty good. If the two schools share info, that’s best for us.” — Hong Lu, chemical and biological engineering major

“Most important is whether this merger actually provides the resources necessary for students to professionally develop because the biggest problem with many Poly students is that they’re not professionals.” — Jose Garcia, computer engineering major

“It’s gonna be an advantage for students but it’s just a shame that the history has to disappear.” — Jesse Heimowitz, construction management major

“I want to take classes there, so as long as I’m not financially hurt by it, it’s good.” — Derrick Maryman, computer engineering major

“Graduating from NYU is better than saying you graduated from Polytechnic University.” — Yves Rugasaguhunga, civil engineering major

“It’s a good thing to have a good affiliation with the school that’s well known and a local affiliation that will do well for us.” — Joseph Lathan, program manager of ePoly

New York University’s proposed takeover of Polytechnic University in Downtown Brooklyn appears to be moving ahead. But before the Manhattan-based institution devours one of our own, we asked people on campus what they thought of the NYU-Poly deal.

Updated 4:35 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

Ivan Rubin from Park Slope says:
I am a graduate of NYU's College of Engineering. ('62)
In the 1970's NYU gave up the engineering school as part of a cost saving measure when NYU was in deep financial trouble. Part of the deal was an infusion of cash as a result of selling the University Heights campus (including the University College of Arts and Sciences) which now houses Bronx Community College.
The NYU engineering faculty merged with what was then Brooklyn Polytech and the combined faculty was housed in the old (pre-Metro Tech) Brooklyn building.
So such a merger is not losing historical Tech but in a way is restoring part of what was in the past.
Feb. 24, 2008, 4:43 pm
Ivan Rubin from Park Slope says:
I am a graduate of NYU's College of Engineering. ('62)
In the 1970's NYU gave up the engineering school at the University Heights campus as part of a cost saving measure when NYU was in deep financial trouble. Part of the deal was an infusion of cash as a result of selling the University Heights campus (including the University College of Arts and Sciences) which now houses Bronx Community College.
The NYU engineering faculty merged with what was then Brooklyn Polytech and the combined faculty was housed in the old (pre-Metro Tech) Brooklyn building.
So such a merger is not losing historical Tech but in a way is restoring part of what was in the past.
Feb. 24, 2008, 4:45 pm

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