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Very Moody

He wrote “The Ice Storm.” He wrote “The Diviners,” but if that isn’t good enough for you, former Brooklyn Heights resident Rick Moody’s new book, “Right Livelihoods,” a collection of three novellas, is out in paperback. Is it a must-read? Of course, especially if you like stories set in an apocalyptic New York City.

“Right Livelihoods” (Back Bay Books) is available at BookCourt [163 Court St., between Pacific and Dean streets in Cobble Hill, (718) 875-3677].

On a ’role

Everyone loves casseroles, but who still makes them? Well, Emily Farris does — and now she has a cookbook so you can get in on the fun, too. Farris — a former Brooklyn Paper writer, by the way — explores the much-mocked history of the beloved casserole, including plumbing the depths of her own horrifying personal discovery: learning that the secret ingredient in her Aunt Susie’s tuna-noodle casserole was Cheeze Whiz. Most important, the book is crammed full of great recipes.

“Casserole Crazy” (Home) will be published on Oct. 7.

Oral text

New York Times bestseller Peter Golenbock (“Bums: An Oral History of the Brooklyn Dodgers”) explores all things Brooklyn in his 663-page oral history ambitiously titled, “In the Country of Brooklyn: Inspiration to the World.” From Jackie Robinson to the Guardian Angels, Golenbock leaves no stone unturned. He even interviewed Marty Markowitz!

“In the Country of Brooklyn: Inspiration to the World” (William Morrow) will be published on Oct. 14.

Updated 5:08 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

cheese says:
It's "casserole" with an E.
Sept. 12, 2008, 1:19 pm

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