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for The Brooklyn Paper
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When Smoke Joint opened in Fort Greene in 2006, the ambrosial banquet of hickory-and-maplewood smoked barbecue made owners Craig Samuel and Ben Grossman (pictured) neighborhood heroes.

As if that weren’t enough, the two will soon open Little Piggy (Market), a 350-square-foot “not-so-general store,” next to their original swine station designed to lure in the rest of the neighborhood’s foodie fanatics.

Slated to let out its first squeal in early August, Little Piggy will feature a retail shop in addition to a take-out counter stocked with Southern-tinged delicacies like smoked hams and cheese grits, and, to make up for the lack of desserts at Smoke Joint, lemon bars and pecan squares. A tight-lipped Grossman wouldn’t reveal the name of the incoming pastry chef, but did say that all of the sweets will be handcrafted and delicious.

“We’ve gotten a lot of requests from our customers for new menu items, like coffee and desserts, but we just didn’t have the space to do it before,” said Grossman. Another feature that’s sure to make those doing without at Smoke Joint jealous? Air conditioning. “We’re a community restaurant, so we’re trying to give people what they want.”

And this being Brooklyn, people want high-end sundries done their way. Accordingly, Samuel and Grossman are sourcing most of their ingredients locally, buying loads at the Fort Greene Park and Grand Army Plaza farmer’s markets.

Little Piggy (Market) (64 Lafayette Ave., at South Elliott Place in Fort Greene) will open in August. For information, call (718) 797-1011.
Updated 4:00 pm, November 10, 2010
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