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Whether you’re an exercise buff, or you’re just trying to fix that funny kink in the middle of your back from sitting at the computer all day, you’ll find both classes and tools for feeling better at Ellie Herman Studio’s newest Pilates center in Park Slope.

This is the third studio established by instructor Herman, author of several books on this fitness craze, including "Pilates For Dummies." First developed by Joseph Pilates to help dancers and athletes rehabilitate from injuries, says Herman, Pilates are a "combination of yoga, gymnastics and dance" that aligns and strengthens the body.

Using a variety of specialized equipment with names like the "wunda-chair" or the "reformer," Pilates exercises can be gentle enough to safely help an injured person ease their pain and challenging enough to train an Olympic athlete.

In addition to classes and private sessions in Pilates, Herman offers teacher training at her fully equipped studio.

Ellie Herman Studios is located at 788A Union St. between Seventh and Eighth avenues in Park Slope. Classes range from $18 to $25. Recommended introductory sessions are $45. For information and reservations, call (718) 230-3717 or visit www.ellie.net.

Updated 4:00 pm, November 10, 2010
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