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NEW CHICK IN TOWN

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The latest arrival on ever-changing Myrtle Avenue is Los Pollitos III, which had its grand opening on May 18. Among the VIPs who welcomed their new neighbor were Dr. Thomas F. Schutte, president of Pratt Institute and chair of the Myrtle Avenue Brooklyn Partnership, and Azola O’Neil, representing state Sen. Velmanette Montgomery. These and other Brooklyn community officials nibbled on half-priced margaritas and appetizers while tapping their feet to mariachi music.

The proprietor of Myrtle Avenue’s newest eatery is Armando Zumba. This is the fifth Mexican and Latin restaurant that the Ecuadorian entrepreneur has opened in the past 11 years, and the third Los Pollitos. (Los Pollitos I and II are in Park Slope and Sunset Park.) Zumba credits his Mexican wife Flavio for creating the restaurant’s dishes.

"Her cooking is the reason we started the restaurants," he says. "We opened our newest place in Clinton Hill because many of the customers who visit us at Los Pollitos II in Park Slope are from that area."

Like its predecessors, the eatery will serve its renowned, beautifully burnished birds (pictured), hot and juicy off the rotisserie’s spit. (Los Pollitos means "little chickens" in Spanish, so a good hen is a necessity.) Other Mexican specialties that can be enjoyed in the brick-walled, wood-furnished dining room, or at the sidewalk cafe, include guacamole, soft tacos and fajitas, and, says Zumba, one of their most popular side dishes, fried plantains in garlic sauce.

Los Pollitos III (499 Myrtle Ave. at Ryerson Street in Clinton Hill) accepts MasterCard and Visa. Entrees: $7.75-$11.95. The restaurant serves brunch daily, from 11:30 am to 4 pm, lunch and dinner daily. Delivery available. For more information, call (718) 636-6125 or 636-6283.

Updated 4:00 pm, November 10, 2010
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