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Dhaka, a new Indian restaurant that specializes in curries and tandoori opened in March on Atlantic Avenue.

Tandoori dishes employ meat or seafood roasted quickly in a tandoor, a traditional clay oven using wood or coal. Out of that oven comes dishes like the shrimp tandoori — large shrimp marinated in herbs and spices, then seared in the oven and served with spinach and mushrooms. (Pictured is owner Mohammed Talukder serving chicken tandoori at a promotional event for “Dine In Brooklyn” at Borough Hall in April.)

Vegetarians will be thrilled with chef Sirazul Islam’s long list of vegetable-based entrees; his “Baingan Bhurta,” a whole eggplant, baked and blended with herbs, sauteed onions and tomatoes, sounds like a winner.

For everyone there’s flat “nan” and puffy “poori” breads plus a few more breads with assorted fillings.

While Dhaka is a popular destination for takeout, the burgundy walls, candlelit, linen-covered tables and soft music make for a relaxing dining environment.

The restaurant’s “lunch box to go” with one meat, seafood or vegetable curry, served with basmatic rice, nan, cabbage, “dal” (lentil curry), condiments and soda may leave your office smelling like Sixth Street in the East Village, but for $6.95 to $8.95 for a whole lot of food, what do you care?

Dhaka Indian Restaurant (148 Atlantic Ave. between Clinton and Henry streets in Cobble Hill) accepts Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover. Entrees: $7.75-$14.95. The restaurant serves lunch and dinner daily. Delivery available. For more information, call (718) 858-4340.

Updated 4:00 pm, November 10, 2010
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