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BISCUIT RISING

The Brooklyn Paper
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Josh Cohen, former chef of Relish, in Williamsburg, has now opened Biscuit, a Carolina-style BBQ restaurant on Flatbush Avenue off Seventh Avenue, right on the edge of Park Slope and Prospect Heights.

"BBQ brings people together," says Cohen, who grew up in the Slope and still resides there. (Acting as manager is Cohen’s childhood friend Robert Lorenzo.)

Maio Martinez (pictured), who sharpened her dough-kneading skills in New York’s Bouley restaurant and the Russian Tea Room, bakes the restaurant’s signature buttermilk biscuits several times a day.

Cohen’s menu also features dry-rubbed pork ribs and chicken that is hot-smoked on the premises; cold-smoked and then broiled salmon; catfish sandwiches; and the "Mr. Brown," a biscuit filled with smoky pork shoulder. Sides include mac and cheese, red beans and rice, collard greens and, for those who like a little meat with their meat, there’s the "lone bone," a single BBQ-ed rib.

Desserts are inspired by church suppers with Devil’s Advocate cake, as well as pecan and apple pies, and that ’60s answer to sweet chic: pineapple upside down cake. Cohen’s is baby sized.

Biscuit (367 Flatbush Ave. between Seventh Avenue and Sterling Place) accepts cash only. Entrees: $6-$13. For information, call (718) 398-2227.

Updated 4:00 pm, November 10, 2010
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